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Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns.

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Presentación del tema: "Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns."— Transcripción de la presentación:

1 Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns

2 Direct Object Pronouns The object that directly receives the action of the verb is called the direct object. The object that directly receives the action of the verb is called the direct object. Bill hit the ball. "Ball" receives the action of the verb "hit." The direct object can also be a person. The direct object can also be a person. Sherry hit Bill. (DO=Bill) Sherry hit Bill. (DO=Bill) The direct object answers the question "what?" or "whom?" with regard to what the subject of the sentence is doing. The direct object answers the question "what?" or "whom?" with regard to what the subject of the sentence is doing. Bill hit the ball. Bill hit what? Bill hit the ball. Sherry hit Bill. Sherry hit whom? Sherry hit Bill. Bill hit the ball. Bill hit what? Bill hit the ball. Sherry hit Bill. Sherry hit whom? Sherry hit Bill.

3 Often, it is desirable to replace the name of the direct object with a pronoun. Often, it is desirable to replace the name of the direct object with a pronoun. Paul bought the flowers. He took the flowers home and gave the flowers to his wife Paul bought the flowers. He took the flowers home and gave the flowers to his wife Paul bought the flowers. He took them home and gave them to his wife. Paul bought the flowers. He took them home and gave them to his wife. When the pronoun replaces the name of the direct object, use the following pronouns: When the pronoun replaces the name of the direct object, use the following pronouns: me (me) te (you-familiar) lo, la (him, her, it, you-formal) nos (us) os (you-all-familiar) los, las (them, you-all-formal) me (me) te (you-familiar) lo, la (him, her, it, you-formal) nos (us) os (you-all-familiar) los, las (them, you-all-formal)

4 In an affirmative statement with one verb, the direct object pronoun comes immediately before the conjugated verb. In an affirmative statement with one verb, the direct object pronoun comes immediately before the conjugated verb. Tengo = I have Tengo la pluma. = I have the pen. La tengo. = I have it. Tengo = I have Tengo la pluma. = I have the pen. La tengo. = I have it. The pronoun (la) comes immediately before the verb (tengo). The pronoun (la) comes immediately before the verb (tengo).

5 Notice that if the subject of the sentence changes, this does not affect the direct object pronoun. Notice that if the subject of the sentence changes, this does not affect the direct object pronoun. Juan tiene = John has Juan tiene la pluma. = John has the pen. Juan la tiene. = John has it. Juan tiene = John has Juan tiene la pluma. = John has the pen. Juan la tiene. = John has it. María la tiene. = Mary has it. María la tiene. = Mary has it. Use la because pluma is feminine Use la because pluma is feminine If the direct object of the sentence changes to a masculine noun, the masculine pronoun must be used. If the direct object of the sentence changes to a masculine noun, the masculine pronoun must be used. Juan lo tiene. Juan tiene = John has Juan tiene el libro. = John has the book. Juan lo tiene. = John has it. Juan lo tiene. Juan tiene = John has Juan tiene el libro. = John has the book. Juan lo tiene. = John has it.

6 If the direct object of the sentence changes from singular to plural, the plural pronoun must be used. If the direct object of the sentence changes from singular to plural, the plural pronoun must be used. María los tiene. María tiene = Mary has María tiene los libros. = Mary has the books. María los tiene. = Mary has them. María los tiene. María tiene = Mary has María tiene los libros. = Mary has the books. María los tiene. = Mary has them.

7 Examples la como I eat it (feminine DO - la sopa, la comida, etc.) lo como I eat it (masculine DO - el pollo, el arroz, etc.) la como I eat it (feminine DO - la sopa, la comida, etc.) lo como I eat it (masculine DO - el pollo, el arroz, etc.) Juan la come. (la comida) Juan eats it. María lo tiene. (el libro) María has it. Juan la come. (la comida) Juan eats it. María lo tiene. (el libro) María has it. Juan come dos sándwiches. Los come. or Juan los come. Juan come dos sándwiches. Los come. or Juan los come. I know you. Te conozco I know you. Te conozco

8 There are two options regarding the placement of the direct object pronoun. There are two options regarding the placement of the direct object pronoun. 1. Place it immediately before the conjugated verb 2. Attach it directly to the infinitive 1. Place it immediately before the conjugated verb 2. Attach it directly to the infinitive Lo quiero ver. I want to see it. Lo debemos comprar. We should buy it. Lo quiero ver. I want to see it. Lo debemos comprar. We should buy it. Quiero verlo. I want to see it. Debemos comprarlo. We should buy it. Quiero verlo. I want to see it. Debemos comprarlo. We should buy it.

9 Indirect Object Pronouns The indirect object (IO) tells us where the direct object (DO) is going. The indirect object (IO) tells us where the direct object (DO) is going. He gives the book to María. DO=Book Where is the book going? To María. IO=María He gives María the book. DO=Book Where is the book going? To María. IO=María

10 Indirect Object Pronouns Me – to me, for me (yo) Me – to me, for me (yo) Te - to you, for you (tù) Te - to you, for you (tù) Le – to you, for you (Ud.) Le – to you, for you (Ud.) to him, for him (èl) to her, for her (ella) Nos – to us, for us Nos – to us, for us Les – to you, for you (pl.) (Uds.) Les – to you, for you (pl.) (Uds.) to them, for them (ellos, ellas) to them, for them (ellos, ellas)

11 The indirect object pronoun precedes the conjugated verb The indirect object pronoun precedes the conjugated verb Juan me compra un regalo Juan me compra un regalo Juan buys me a present Juan buys me a present Te necesito comprar un sombrero Te necesito comprar un sombrero I need to buy you a hat I need to buy you a hat

12 I.O. & D.O. Together When you have both a direct object pronoun and an indirect object pronoun in the same sentence, the indirect object pronoun comes first. When you have both a direct object pronoun and an indirect object pronoun in the same sentence, the indirect object pronoun comes first. Ellos me los dan. They give them to me. IO pronoun: me DO pronoun: lo Ellos me los dan. They give them to me. IO pronoun: me DO pronoun: lo

13 Whenever both pronouns begin with the letter "l" change the first pronoun to "se. Whenever both pronouns begin with the letter "l" change the first pronoun to "se. For example: For example: Le lo se lo Le lo se lo Les los se los Les los se los Les la se la Les la se la Les las se las Les las se las No se lo tengo. I don't have it for you. No se lo tengo. I don't have it for you.

14 Because the pronoun se can have so many meanings, it is often helpful to clarify it by using a prepositional phrase Because the pronoun se can have so many meanings, it is often helpful to clarify it by using a prepositional phrase Él se lo dice a Juan. He tells it to him. (to Juan) Él se lo dice a Juan. He tells it to him. (to Juan) In sentences with two verbs, there are two options regarding the placement of the pronouns. Place them immediately before the conjugated verb or attach them directly to the infinitive. In sentences with two verbs, there are two options regarding the placement of the pronouns. Place them immediately before the conjugated verb or attach them directly to the infinitive. She should explain it to me. Ella me lo debe explicar. Ella debe explicármelo. She should explain it to me. Ella me lo debe explicar. Ella debe explicármelo.


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