La descarga está en progreso. Por favor, espere

La descarga está en progreso. Por favor, espere

21st Century Skills: Defining Best Practice in Todays Classrooms Part II Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Dean, new School of Behavioral Sciences and Education.

Presentaciones similares


Presentación del tema: "21st Century Skills: Defining Best Practice in Todays Classrooms Part II Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Dean, new School of Behavioral Sciences and Education."— Transcripción de la presentación:

1 21st Century Skills: Defining Best Practice in Todays Classrooms Part II Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Dean, new School of Behavioral Sciences and Education Director, Instituto de Enseñanza y Aprendizaje (IDEA) Director, Online Education Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador Association of American Schools in South America (AASSA) Conference Quito, Ecuador March 2012

2 Background Masters from Harvard University in International Education and Development and doctorate (Ph.D.) from Capella University (cross-disciplinary approach comparing findings in neuroscience, psychology, pedagogy, cultural anthropology and linguistics). Bachelors of Arts (International Relations) and Bachelors of Science (Communications) from Boston University, magna cum laude. Director of the Institute for Research and Educational Development (IDEA), Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador and professor of Education and Neuropsychology. New Director of Online Education. New Dean of the School of Behavioral Sciences and Education (USFQ). Teacher (pre-kindergarten through university) with 24 years of comparative research experience and support to hundreds of schools in 22 countries.

3

4 Program 1. Part 1: Critical Thinking, Metacognition, the Autonomous learner 2. Part 2: Habits of Mind, Activity 3. Part 3: Activity 4. Part 4: What is best practice in the 21 st century classroom?

5 Relationship? 21 st century skills Autonomous (attitude) learner (aptitude) Critical Thinker Metacognition (Emotional Intelligence as a precursor?) Self efficacy and self-confidence

6 John Hattie (a meta analysis of 900+ meta analyses) Major domains of interest Curricula Home Parent School Student Teacher Teaching

7 A frightening conclusion I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in the classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. It is my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher I possess a tremendous power to make a childs life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated, and a child humanized or de- humanized. –Haim Ginott Cited in Martin, D.J. & Loomis, K.S. (2006). Building teachers: A constructivist approach to introducing education, p.222

8 Autonomous Learner

9 Third Pillar: Act Autonomously Individuals who take responiability for their own lives and actions in social contexts… Take initiative? Entrepreneurial? Reflective: Not only able to routinely apply a set formula or method to react to situations, but rather the ability to confront and adapt new views based on assessment. Responsible for ones own actions? Critical thinker? Rychen, D.S. & Salganik, L.H. (Eds.). (2003). The definition and selection of key competencies: Executive summary. OECD: DeSeCo publications. Downloaded from 111.oecd.org/edu&statistics/deseco. (p.5).

10 Talking points History of autonomous learners Foreign language Gifted students Difference between self-regulation and autonomy? (Emotional intelligence) Requirements? KNOW THYSELF Confusions (i.e., need to know ones own learning style to be able to know how to manage oneself)

11 Autonomous learner An autonomous learner is "one who solves problems or develops new ideas through a combination of divergent and convergent thinking and functions with minimal external guidance in selected areas of endeavour (Betts and Knapp, 1981). Link a Autonomous Learner Model Australia:

12 Autonomous learner On a general note, the term autonomy has come to be used in at least five ways (see Benson & Voller, 1997: 2): 1. for situations in which learners study entirely on their own; 2. for a set of skills which can be learned and applied in self-directed learning; 3. for an inborn capacity which is suppressed by institutional education; 4. for the exercise of learners' responsibility for their own learning; 5. for the right of learners to determine the direction of their own learning. Retrieved from

13 Autonomous learners have insights into their learning styles and strategies; take an active approach to the learning task at hand; are willing to take risks, i.e., to communicate in the target language at all costs; are good guessers; attend to form as well as to content, that is, place importance on accuracy as well as appropriacy; develop the target language into a separate reference system and are willing to revise and reject hypotheses and rules that do not apply; and have a tolerant and outgoing approach to the target language. Autonomous learner (language) See Omaggio, 1978, cited in Wenden, 1998: cited in article retrieved from

14 Critical Thinker

15 In todays education it is commonly accepted without challenge (and often with simple resignation) that someone (from the Ministry, the school administration or some other part) thinks for us, tells us what to do, how, when and where we should teach and learn. We prefer to follow rules imposed upon us from the outside rather than run the risk of being autonomous. Many times, those teachers who claim the contrary, when found faced with a classroom of students, blindly agree to conventional norms and play it safe, without questioning…But if teachers do not develop critical thinking about their own actions, down to the most trivial detail, they will be hard pressed to transmit these skills to their students. Critical thinking…. Battro y Denham 2003, transñated by the Author.

16 Presumptions The first rule in Education: Do no harm Education s greatest goal is to create critical thinkers (maximize the potential of all learners)

17 Critical thinking is…. …the ability to analyze facts, generate and organize ideas, defend opinions, make comparisons, make references, evaluate arguments and resolve problems. Chance 1986

18 Intellectual curiosity Intellectual courage Intellectual humility Intellectual empathy Intellectual integrity Intellectual perseverance Faith in reason Act justly: Have the disposition and be conscience of the necessity to consider improbable outcomes. (Intellectual generosity) Characteristics of a person who thinks critically Paul (1992) cited in Muñoz & Beltrán 2001, tranalated by the author

19 The Process: A critical thinking guide 1. Unite all the information 2. Understand all the concepts 3. Ask where the information came from (biases) 4. Analyze the source of information (credibility) 5. Doubt the conclusions 6. Accustom oneself to uncertainty 7. Exam the whole 8. Generate new or distinct ideas/information. Adapated in part from Ciencias de la Teirra (nd).

20 Cognitive skills and critical thinking Related to cognitive skills, I have gathered here a list of what experts say is fundamental to critical thinking: Interpretation Analysis Evaluation Inference Explanation and Self regulation Facione 2003

21 Interpretation Understand and express the significance, relation and importance of a wide variety of experiences, situations, data, events, judgments, conventions, beliefs, rules, procedures and criteria. Facione, 2003, translated by the author

22 Analyze Identify the relation that exists between the proposed inference and reality, between declarations, questions, concepts, descriptions or other forms of proposed representations to express beliefs, judgments, experiences, reasons, information and opinion. Facione, 2003, translated by the author

23 Evaluation …determine the credibility of the claims or other statements that are descriptions based on perceptions, experiences, situations, judgments, beliefs or opinions and cede to logical relations between inference about what is proposed and what is real in the claims, descriptions, questions or other forms of representation. Facione, 2003, translated by the author

24 Inference Identify and secure the necessary elements to reach reasonable conclusions, formulate conjectures and hypothesis, consider relevant information and deduce consequences, confirm data and claims, principles, evidence, judgments, beliefs, opinions, concepts, descriptions, questions or other representational forms. Facione, 2003, translated by the author

25 Self-regulation Self-consciously monitor ones own cognitive activities, the steps used in each activity and the results achieved through deductive reasoning, especially using analytical and evaluative skills for inferred information. Judge oneself by questioning, confirming, validating or correcting inferences and ensure that they are rational and the result of a thorough thinking process. The two sub-categories of self-regulation are self-examination and self-correction. Facione, 2003, translated by the author

26 Metacognition

27 6-year old explaining ratios: Kids teaching kids: interview-mathtrain.htmlhttp://www.techsmith.com/camtasia- interview-mathtrain.html Group resolution of problem: mathtrain.html mathtrain.html

28

29 Lecturas recomendadas Journal: Metacognition and Learning

30 Emotional intelligence as a precursor?

31 Retrieved on 12 March 2012 from intelligence-in-business.htm

32 Retrieved March 12, 2012 from

33 What is metacognition? 1. Definition of metacognición. 2. Write your own definition. 3. Be prepared to explain how you reached this definition.

34 Metacognition …la capacidad que tenemos de autorregular el propio aprendizaje, es decir, de planificar qué estrategias han de utilizarse en cada situación, aplicarlas, controlar el proceso, evaluarlo para detectar posibles fallos, y como consecuencia... transferir todo ello a una nueva actuación. Carlos Dorado Perea (1996). Aprender a aprender: estrategias y técnicas. Descargado el 20 de diciembre 2004 de

35 Metacognición Manera de aprender a razonar sobre el propio razonamiento, aplicación del pensamiento al acto de pensar, aprender a aprender, mejorar las actividades y las tareas intelectuales que uno lleva a cabo usando la reflexión para orientarlas y asegurarse una buena ejecución. Yael Abramovicz Rosenblatt. Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

36 Metacognición Es un macroproceso, de orden superior, caracterizado por un alto nivel de conciencia y de control voluntario, cuya finalidad es gestionar otros procesos cognitivos más simples y elementales. Daniel Ocaña A. Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

37 Metacognición La Metacognición es conocer y autorregular los propios procesos mentales básicos, requeridos para un adecuado aprendizaje. Yenny Marentes. Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

38 Metacognición Metacognición es un término que se usa para designar una serie de operaciones, actividades y funciones cognoscitivas llevadas a cabo por una persona, mediante un conjunto interiorizado de mecanismos intelectuales que le permiten recabar, producir y evaluar información, a la vez que hacen posible que dicha persona pueda conocer. P. Zenteno. (s.f.). Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

39 Metacognición Es la conciencia y gestión de los procesos mentales cuando solucionamos nuestros problemas. Edgar Alarcón. (s.f.). Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

40 Metacognición Metacognición, habilidad para ir más allá de lo que conoces y recuperarlo como información para fijar un aprendizaje. Aida Sandoval. (s.f.). Descargado el 20 de septiembre de 2010 de

41 Write your own definition of metacognition 1. Write your own definition. 2. In your group, explain how you got to this…

42 ¿Cómo lograste la definición? ¿Comenzaste mediante un análisis de la tarea y la interpretación de los requisitos de la tarea en términos de sus conocimientos y creencias? ¿Enfocaste su atención? ¿Te fijaste en objetivos específicos? ¿Revisaste todo el conocimiento previo disponible para desarrollar una estrategia para desarrollar tu definición? ¿Hablaste contigo mismo? ¿Después de la aplicación de estrategias, evaluaste el éxito de sus esfuerzos? ¿Ajustaste tus estrategias y esfuerzos con base en tu percepción de los progresos en el curso? ¿Utilizaste estrategias de motivación para mantenerte en la tarea cuando ellos se desaniman o tienen dificultades? Edward Vockell. (2001). Educational Psychology: A Practical Approach, ch. 7, University of Purdue. Descargado el 27 de septiembre 2010 de

43 Descargado el 27 de septiembre 2010 de =metacognici%C3%B3n&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&fp=61bc7ef7ad88f136

44

45 Primera definición (1976) J. H. Flavell utilizó por primera vez el término metacognición: La metacognición se refiere al conocimiento que uno tiene acerca de sus propios procesos cognitivos o cualquier cosa relacionada a éstos, como pueden ser las propiedades necesarias para el aprendizaje o adquisición de información. Por ejemplo, estoy haciendo metacognición si me doy cuenta que tengo más dificultad en aprender A que B; o si me impacta que debo hacer doble check en C antes de aceptarlo como hecho. J. H. Flavell (1976, p. 232). *Nisbet, Shucksmith (1984). The Seventh Sense (p6) SCRE Publications

46 Seven factors in a good learning environment: 1. Safe environment 2. Intellectual freedom 3. Respect 4. Self-directed 5. Paced challenges 6. Active learning 7. Feedback< Billington, D. (1997). Seven characteristics of highly effective learning programs

47 To develop autonomous learners, I need to….

48 Habits of Mind

49 The 16 Habits of Mind (pdf in folder)

50 16 Habits of Mind 1. Persistence 2. Managing impulsivity 3. Listening To OthersWith Understanding and Empathy 4. Thinking Flexibly 5. Thinking About our Thinking (Metacognition) 6. Striving For Accuracy and Precision 7. Questioning and Posing Problems 8. Applying Past Knowledge to New Situations 9. Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision 10. Gathering Data through All Senses 11. Creating, Imagining, and Innovating 12. Responding with Wonderment and Awe 13. Taking Responsible Risks 14. Finding Humor 15. Thinking Interdependently 16. Learning Continuously Professor Arthur L. Costa, Universidad de California at Sacramento

51 Arthur Costa

52 Habit 1: Persistence 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

53 Habit 2: Manage impulsivity 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

54 Habit 3: Listen with empathy and understanding 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

55 Habit 4: Think flexibly 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

56 Habit 5: Metacognition 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

57 Habit 6: Precision 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

58 Habit 7: Apply prior knowledge 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

59 Habit 8: Questioning and posing problems 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

60 Habit 9: Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

61 Habit 10:Gathering information from all the senses 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

62 Habit 11: Create, imagine innovate 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

63 Habit 12: Respond with Wonderment and Awe 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

64 Habit 13: Take responsible risks 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

65 Habit 14: Find humor 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

66 Habit 15: Think interdependently 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

67 Habit 16: Lifelong learning 16 Hábitos de la Mente descargado el 19 de septiembre 2009 de

68 Portafolios de aprendizaje Entre los beneficios para los instructores que evalúan el trabajo de los estudiantes se encuentra que los portafolios de aprendizaje: "(a) capturan la sustancia intelectual y la situación de aprendizaje en formas que otros métodos de evaluación no pueden, (b) alientan a los estudiantes a asumir un papel en la documentación, observación y revisión del aprendizaje; son una poderosa herramienta para mejorar; y (d) crean una cultura de profesionalidad acerca del aprendizaje(p. 6). Entre los principales beneficios para los estudiantes está la práctica de estrategias reales para alcanzar un aprendizaje efectivo y la oportunidad de autoevaluación. Ejemplos de estrategias para mejorar la metacognición: Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

69 Ejemplos de estrategias para mejorar la metacognición: Plan Individual de Aprendizaje (ILP en inglés por Individual Learning Plan ) como un contrato con el instructor. Linda H. Chiang (1998) describe el proceso como el establecimiento de objetivos ILP, el desarrollo de una ILP, el seguimiento del proceso de aprendizaje, escribir un diario reflexivo, la realización de conferencias uno-a-uno, y hacer evaluaciones sumativas" (p. 5). Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

70 Prueba de Debriefing : Maryellen Weimer (2002) en El aprendizaje centrado en la enseñanza describe cómo utiliza la metacognición cuando ella debriefs a los estudiantes después de devolverles el examen, a fin de darles un sentido de control sobre su aprendizaje. Se pide a los estudiantes que escriban el número de preguntas en que fallaron y luego se realizan tres análisis: Ejemplos de estrategias para mejorar la metacognición: Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

71 1. Los estudiantes primero revisan sus notas acerca de las preguntas en que fallaron y determinan si alguna de éstas fueron cuando faltaron a clase y tuvieron que depender de los apuntes de otro alumno. 2. Dr. Weimer luego identifica cuáles de las preguntas provienen de la lectura asignada y cuáles a partir de sus conferencias, y le pide a los estudiantes que identifiquen si hay más que provienen de las lecturas o de los apuntes de clase. 3. Les pide entonces a los estudiantes que revisen su examen, miren las respuestas que cambiaron, y determinen cuántos de esos cambios resultaron en respuestas correctas. Si hay un patrón, es un autoconocimiento de mucha utilidad. Luego los estudiantes escriben una nota de reflexión para sí mismos acerca de lo que aprendieron de la preparación y presentación de este examen, lo cual les ayudará a prepararse para el siguiente, y describir qué pasos tomarían entre éste y el próximo examen. Ejemplos de estrategias para mejorar la metacognición: Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

72 1. Vista previa de la lectura asignada Pedir a los estudiantes que escriban lo que ya saben sobre el tema del capítulo; breve discusión. Presentar un resumen oral de los capítulos de la clase anterior. Hacer preguntas interesantes que serán contestadas en la tarea de lectura. Hacer una encuesta sobre algunos de los temas abordados en la tarea de lectura. Hacer hincapié en el interés, utilidad, y el ajuste en la secuencia del capítulo. Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

73 Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición 2. No repetir la lectura en una conferencia Evite que el escuchar la clase se convierta para los estudiantes en su estrategia de lectura. Cuando los estudiantes no leen o no pueden leer los capítulos de texto, y para asegurarse de que el contenido del curso está "cubierto", resulta tentador decirles a los estudiantes lo que deberían haber aprendido si hubieran leído los textos. Entre las razones para no dar clases sobre las lecturas asignadas están: Los estudiantes no aprenderán a leer para la comprensión -una habilidad necesaria. Como estudiantes pasivos escuchando y tomando notas, los estudiantes no usarán el tiempo de clase para tareas de pensamiento de orden superior, tales como aplicar, analizar, sintetizar, comparar, evaluar. Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

74 Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición 3. Enseñar explícitamente las estrategias de estudio que serán efectivas en el curso Demostrar cómo realizar las tareas asignadas por escrito Proporcionar modelos Proporcionar información Hacer que los objetivos de lectura para los estudiantes sean claros: leer para una comprensión general o detallada, leer críticamente, o leer para el discernimiento. Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

75 Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición 4. Como tarea, haz que los estudiantes escriban en respuesta al libro de texto asignado de lectura. Escribe tus instrucciones diarias para los estudiantes en el programa del curso todos los días. Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

76 Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición 5. Vigilar el cumplimiento de tareas Desarrolla formas para asegurarte que los estudiantes hagan su tarea diaria escrita sin tener que cargarte dando retroalimentación diaria o calificaciones. Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

77 Estrategias de clase que apoyan la metacognición 6. Utilizar la tarea escrita en todo el grupo o en grupos pequeños, en debates y actividades. Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

78 Reflexión para mejorar la metacognición Leer para la comprensión "¿Qué es lo que notas al leer cuando estás entendiendo lo que lees? ¿Qué es lo que causa dificultades a la hora de leer? ¿En qué áreas de la lectura o el recuerdo se siente más a gusto? "(Soldner, 1997) ¿Qué partes del pasaje me confunden? ¿Qué puedo hacer para aclarar la confusión? "(Gourgey, 1997) Respuestas personales asociativas y afectivas "¿Cómo te hace sentir este poema? ¿En tu vida qué pudo haber influenciado la forma de responder al poema? (Newton, 1991) Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from

79 10h30-12h30 Game!

80 The Art of Questioning The teacher does not have to answer all the questions (paradigm shift for some) Habit of answering a question with another question. Accustom oneself to allow the student to be the center of the classroom discussion.

81 Essential Questions Activity 1. Form groups of 4-5 people 2. Separate the concepts into categories 3. Name the categories 4. Create a question in which the answer is the contents of the category. 5. Modify your question (#3) into an essential question. 6. (Create a single essential question for the entire page.)

82 Essential questions Get the to the heart of the subject; Cannot be answered with a simple yes or no; Leads to a cross-disciplinary understanding of concepts; Naturally leads to other questions. Based on Wiggins & McTighe, 2005

83 Concepts

84 13h30-14h30 Autonomy

85 15h00-16h00 Activities that encourage autonomy

86 Examples of activities that stimulate critical thinking 1. Debate 2. Problem-based learning 3. Case studies 4. Stories, fables 5. Dramatization 6. Role play 7. Crossword puzzles 8. Questioning The Art of Questioning Essential Questions

87 Example: Debate The teachers job: Clear theme Clear rules Clear time frame Example themes: Childrens rights Smoking in public places Euthanasia School uniforms Student assessment: Content Strategy Final argumentation

88 References Battro, Antonio M., & Percival J. Denham. (2003). Pensamiento crítico. Argentina: Papers Editor. Descargada de el 1 de octubre Paul, R. (1992/2001). Características de un pensador crítico. En A.C. Muñoz Hueso & J. Beltrán Llera, Fomento del pensamiento crítico mediante la intervención en una unidad didáctica sobre la técnica de detección de información sesgada en los alumnos de Enseñanza Secundaria Obligatoria en Ciencias Sociales Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación. Descargada de el 11 de noviembre Rychen, D.S. & Salganik, L.H. (Eds.). (2003). The definition and selection of key competencies: Executive summary. OECD: DeSeCo publications. Descargado de 111.oecd.org/edu&statistics/deseco. Traducido por la autora.

89 For more information: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Universidad San Francisco de Quito Casa Corona, primer piso Campus Cumbayá Diego de Robles y vía Interoceánica ECUADOR Tel.: (593) ; (593) Fax: (593) P.O.BOX , Quito - Ecuador Telf: x1338

90 Referencias Applegate, M. D., Quinn, K. B., & Applegate, A. J. (1994). Using metacognitive strategies to enhance achievement for at-risk liberal arts students. Journal of Reading, 38, Berthoff, A. E. (1987). Dialectical notebooks and the audit of meaning. In T. Fulwiler (Ed.), The Journal Book (pp ). Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook. Commander, N. E., & Valeri-Gold, M. (2001). The learning portfolio: A valuable tool for increasing metacognitive awareness. The Learning Assistance Review 6 (2), Chiang, L. H. (1998). Enhancing metacognitive skills through learning contracts. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Mid-Western Educational Research Association, Chicago. (ERIC Document Reproduction Services No. ED ). El-Hindi, A. E. (1997). Connecting reading and writing: College learners metacognitive awareness. Journal of Developmental Education, 21 (2), Gourgey, A. F. (1997). Getting students to think about their own thinking in an integrated verbal-mathematics course. Research and Teaching in Developmental Education, 14,

91 Hill, M. (1991). Writing summaries promotes thinking and learning across the curriculum but why are they so difficult to write? Journal of Reading, 34, Hacker, D. J. (1998). Definitions and empirical foundations. In D. J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, & A. C. Graesser (Eds.), Metacognition in educational theory and practice (pp. 1-23). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Martín del Buey, F., Martín Palacio, M.E., Camarero Suárez, F. & Sáez Navarro, C. (s.f.) Procesos metacognitivos: Estratñegicas y Técnicas. Descargado de Metacognitivos _b.pdf Marzano, R. J., Brandt, R. S., Hughes, C. S., Jones, B. F., Presseisen, B. Z., Rankin, S. C., & Suhor, C.(1988). Dimensions of thinking: A framework for curriculum and instruction. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. McKeachie, W. J. (1988). The need for study strategy training. In C. E. Weinstein, E. T. Goetz, & P. A. Alexander (Eds.), Learning and study strategies: Issues in assessment, instruction, and evaluation (pp. 3-9). New York: Academic Press. Newton, E. V. (1991). Developing metacognitive awareness: the response journal in college composition. Journal of Reading, 34,

92 Nickerson, R. S., Perkins, D. N., & Smith, E. E. (1985). The teaching of thinking. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Nist, S. (1993). What the literature says about academic literacy. Georgia Journal of Reading, (Fall-Winter), McKeachie, W. J. (1988). The need for study strategy training. In C. E. Weinstein, E. T. Goetz, & P. A. Alexander (Eds.), Learning and study strategies: Issues in assessment, instruction, and evaluation (pp. 3-9). New York: Academic Press. Newton, E. V. (1991). Developing metacognitive awareness: the response journal in college composition. Journal of Reading, 34, Nickerson, R. S., Perkins, D. N., & Smith, E. E. (1985). The teaching of thinking. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Nist, S. (1993). What the literature says about academic literacy. Georgia Journal of Reading, (Fall-Winter), Paris, S. G. (1988). Models and metaphors of learning strategies. In C. E. Weinstein, E. T. Goetz, & P. A. Alexander (Eds.), Learning and study strategies: Issues in assessment, instruction, and evaluation (pp ). New York: Academic Press.

93 Peirce, W. (2003). Metacognition: Study Strategies, Monitoring, and Motivation Downloaded on 27 Sept 2010 from Ramp, L. C. & Guffey, J. S. (1999). The impact of metacognitive training on academic self- efficacy of selected underachieving college students. (ERIC Document Reproduction Services No. ED ). Paris, S. G. (1988). Models and metaphors of learning strategies. In C. E. Weinstein, E. T. Goetz, & P. A. Alexander (Eds.), Learning and study strategies: Issues in assessment, instruction, and evaluation (pp ). New York: Academic Press. Ramp, L. C. & Guffey, J. S. (1999). The impact of metacognitive training on academic self- efficacy of selected underachieving college students. (ERIC Document Reproduction Services No. ED ) Simpson, M. L., & Nist, S. L. (1990). Textbook annotation: An effective and efficient study strategy for college students. Journal of Reading, 34, Simpson, M. L., & Nist, S. L. (2000). An update on strategic learning: Its more than textbook reading strategies. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 43 (6). Retrieved November 8, 2002, from Academic Search Premier.

94 Soldner, L. B. (1997). Self-assessment and the reflective reader. Journal of College Reading and Learning, 28, Stage, F. K., Muller, P. A., Kinzie, J., & Simmons, A. (1998). Creating learning centered classrooms: What does learning theory have to say? Higher Education Report vol. 26, number 4. Washington, D. C.: Association for the Study of Higher Education. Simpson, M. L., & Nist, S. L. (1990). Textbook annotation: An effective and efficient study strategy for college students. Journal of Reading, 34, Simpson, M. L., & Nist, S. L. (2000). An update on strategic learning: Its more than textbook reading strategies. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 43 (6). Retrieved November 8, 2002, from Academic Search Premier. Soldner, L. B. (1997). Self-assessment and the reflective reader. Journal of College Reading and Learning, 28, Stage, F. K., Muller, P. A., Kinzie, J., & Simmons, A. (1998). Creating learning centered classrooms: What does learning theory have to say? Higher Education Report vol. 26, number 4. Washington, D. C.: Association for the Study of Higher Education. Taylor, S. (1999). Better learning through better thinking: Developing students metacognitive abilities. Journal of College Reading and Learning, 30 (1), 34ff. Retrieved November 9, 2002, from Expanded Academic Index ASAP. Vockell, E. (2001). Educational Psychology: A Practical Approach, ch. 7, University of Purdue. Descargado el 27 de septiembre 2010 de

95 Para mayor información Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Directora Instituto de Enseñanza y Aprendizaje (IDEA) de la Universidad San Francisco de Quito Casa Corona, primer piso Telf: x1338; x1005; 1020


Descargar ppt "21st Century Skills: Defining Best Practice in Todays Classrooms Part II Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Dean, new School of Behavioral Sciences and Education."

Presentaciones similares


Anuncios Google